9 Types of Red Plant

Types of Red Plant list

  1. Amaryllis
  2. Anthurium
  3. Bleeding Heart
  4. Poinsettia
  5. Poppies
  6. Red Azalea
  7. Red Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
  8. Red Lily (Nymphaea rubra)
  9. Red Roses

What are some red plants?

Red plants and flowers get their pigment from anthocyanins or carotenoids. In some species, these pigments even mask the green chlorophyll in leaves, turning them completely red. A great example of this is the Poinsettia, which has red leaves below its flowers. Examples of red flowers include Roses and Amaryllis.

What are the bushes with red flowers?

There are many shrubs with red flowers. Probably the most popular of them all is the Red Azalea, which is a small, perennial bush. Nonetheless, red Chrysanthemums are definitely a close contender. Both of these shrubs are widely available and suit either the back of flower beds or containers.

What flowers are only red?

Though most cultivars of flowers come in several colours (like Tulips, for example), certain plants only produce red flowers. These flowers are often highly sought-after for this attractive colour. One example is of course the Red Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis). Other red flowers include Amaryllis and Red Lily (Nymphaea rubra).

What are red perennials?

If you go to the trouble of planting a beautiful red plant or flower, it’s nice to have it come back every year. Whilst a range of perennial red houseplants are available, such as Poinsettia and Anthurium, there are also hardy outdoor perennials. These include Red Roses and Bleeding Hearts.

Other red perennials include:

  • Clematis
  • Yarrow
  • Peony
  • Daylillies
  • Hibiscus
  • Salvia
  • Primrose
  • Wild Bergamot

What plant has large red flowers?

As we have discussed, there is a large number of plants with red flowers. Only a handful, however, have very large blooms. One plant with particularly large red flowers is the Amaryllis, which is a bulb plant from western South Africa. You can read more about later in this article.

9 Varieties of Red Plants

1. Amaryllis

Types of Red Plants
1. Amaryllis

This hardy bulb hails from South Africa, and as such naturally blooms during the months of November to March. The timeframe varies depending on when you plant them, however. Growing large, heavy flowers, red Amaryllis are truly spectacular and will flower within about two months from planting.

Overall, their requirements are quite low, but they do like direct sun, and seem suited to being houseplants in the Northern Hemisphere. To keep them warm enough, it’s best to place them on a windowsill where they can benefit from the light coming in. After they die back, you can keep the bulbs and they will regrow the following year.

2. Anthurium

Types of red flowers
2. Anthurium

Second on our list is the Anthurium, which incidentally goes by a few other common names. These include Flamingo Flower and Laceleaf. To be precise, an Anthurium is any plant in the Anthurium genus, which itself is included in the Arum family. Like most other Aroids, Anthurium are particularly ornamental, with red Anthuriums being amongst the favourites of horticulturists.

Red Anthuriums are tropical species that are used to a gentle rainforest climate. This means they are best kept as houseplants and may suffer from direct sunlight. Given indirect light, however, they will blossom sporadically throughout the year.

3. Bleeding Heart

Bleeding Heart
3. Bleeding Heart

A familiar sight in many gardens, Bleeding Hearts are reliable bloomers in late spring. Usually growing to 2 to 3 feet tall (60 – 90cm), they make a bright, yet delicate addition to the back or middle of a flower bed.

Though they are indeed an outdoor plant, it’s important to remember that Bleeding Hearts are not resistant to heat or direct sunlight. To keep them coming back every year, and flowering well, you should plant these flowers in a shady spot with damp soil. Drought or excessive heat will cause them to die back. In the wintertime, they will die back with frost, but this is not usually a problem as they will return in the spring.

4. Poinsettia

Red plant cultivars
4. Poinsettia

The Poinsettia is familiar to everyone, given that you can’t go through a single holiday season without seeing one! It’s obvious that they’re beautiful red leaves are what has led to them becoming the unofficial “Christmas plant,” but where did they come from?

Like the Anthurium, Poinsettias are another tropical species, which is why in most latitudes they’re kept as house plants. Originally from southern Mexico and central America, the Poinsettia was introduced to the US market as early as the 1820s. If you wish to grow this plant, it’s important to remember that it requires a period of long, dark nights to bloom.

5. Poppies

Types of Red Plants
5. Poppies

Poppies have long been used for medical, agricultural, and ornamental purposes. The large Papaver somniferum species, for example, produces seeds that are used as a topping on bread. It also produces opium, a powerful analgesic which was widely used in ancient times.

These days, The Common Poppy is perhaps the most familiar, being used in memorial services for the First World War. This species can be found growing wild throughout most of the Old World. If you wish to grow them, they will do well in direct sun, but may only be annual or biennial. Generally, this isn’t a problem as they will spontaneously grow from fallen seeds each spring. In some areas, Poppies have the potential to become agricultural pests – they really aren’t hard to grow!

6. Red Azalea

Red plant varieties
6. Red Azalea

Azaleas are in fact a group of Rhododendrons. Occurring in a huge array of species and varieties, they can be grown in a variety of climate types and situations. Unlike true Rhododendrons, however, Azaleas shed their leaves in fall. Being a medium sized perennial shrub, Azaleas can take several years to bloom. This makes it a good idea to buy them well started rather than grow them from seed.

When planting Azaleas, be sure to research the soil type in your area. Most species will only do well in acidic soil. They also dislike direct sunlight. Another consideration is the blooming time of each cultivar and species. Whilst some Azaleas bloom fairly briefly in the spring, others have adapted to blossom during summer or even winter. With some research, you could plant several varieties and enjoy their flowers for most of the growing season.

7. Red Cardinal Flower (Lobelia cardinalis)

Red flower varieties
7. Red Cardinal Flower

The Cardinal Flower is a delicate looking herbaceous plant which grows numerous flowers on stalks. Growing to as high as 3 feet (1m), this plant will make a pleasant addition to the back of a flower bed. Depending on the variety, they will reliably flower each year from midsummer to autumn. The flowers themselves are quite large on well established examples, often being 2 inches (5cm) or longer.

In the wild, this species grows in damp or marshy locations all the way from Canada to northern South America. If you grow them, make sure you choose a nice, damp spot to reflect their natural preferences. Nonetheless, they will tolerate moderate sun in all but the hottest climates. After the plants start blooming, you will notice that they attract a large array of pollinating insects, from beetles to butterflies.

8. Red Lily (Nymphaea rubra)

Red water plant varieties
8. Red Lily

As you may have noticed from this article, most red plants are terrestrial. Red aquatic plants tend to be much harder to find. One stunning example, though, is the Red Lily (Nymphaea rubra), also known as the Red Water Lily. As the name implies, the Red Lilies are a variant of a species of water Lily called Nymphaea pubescens.

Growing throughout south-central and south-east Asia, these plants occupy wetland habitats in tropical climate zones. Like other Lilies, they grow round Lily pads, which themselves are often red or purple. When they blossom, the combination of their pink or red flowers and colourful leaves can completely transform a pond. Generally, they do well in non-acidic waters. Their drawback is that they will not tolerate the cold and cannot be grown outdoors in cool climates.

9. Red Roses

Types of red plant
9. Red Roses

When you think of red flowers, it’s almost certainly red Roses that spring to mind first. Given the association of the colour red with romance, Roses have long been a Valentine’s Day favourite. They also appear in a great many poems, songs, and cultural references. It’s safe to say that red Roses in particular enjoy enduring popularity.

These days, numerous cultivars of Rose bush are available, each with its own specific preferences and care requirements. Given that they are perennial, and require pruning, growing them is a long-term commitment. The commitment is well worth it though; you can grow red Roses that will reach various sizes and even grow along a fence or trellis.

Infographic – 5 Types of Red Flowers

5 Types of Red Flowers:

  1. Amaryllis
  2. Red Roses
  3. Poppies
  4. Red Cardinal Flower
  5. Red Azalea
5 Types of Red Flower
5 Types of Red Flower

Download infographic for Types of Red Plant as a PDF

Other resources relating to Red Plants:

Best Plants with Red Flowers

25+ Red Flowers to add bold colour to your garden

14 Red Perennials

10 Houseplants with red leaves

Clarisse Walters
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